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authorhouse

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authorhouse Reviews

elizabeth kurtz November 18, 2010
scam
I have paid for a pinacle package 1 year ago that I was told would include 50 colored photos at no extra cost. Not true I find out today. I get 10 black and white at a cost of 5.00 each. And I had also found out that I have to pay an additional 1100.00 to 1500.00 for advertising. I am going with Exlibrus who offers me a great deal, a half price package with no additional cost for advertising and unlimited black and white photos. and the royalties are 50%. Well my main complaint is that I have not signed a contract with authorhouse. I have only a book id number and an author id number. I was told prior I would get a refund if I chose not to publish, rather changed my mind which I did. Now my newly appointed consultant Branden Drake tells me I receive no money back. I reminded him that his company has done NO WORK ON MY BOOK. He then told me to discuss the matter with my original consultant who is Mr. Gerry Shyrock. I left him a message and I hope that I can write him a great review. If not I will hound them and contact the better business beareau in Indiana.
Gary Reginald Dodge September 28, 2010
Theft of cash
I have written, "Acts of War: JESUS/ALEXANDER & "JFK, "" which cost me out-of-pocket over six-thousand dollars in Galley Modifications since 2003, and while I firmly believed it would sell well, (and it did), I only received mere pennies for my hard and dangeous work, with no royalty check exceeding more tha 9 dollars. I knew they were stealing from me for sure when a friend calleed me from Pittsburgh, Pennsylvaia, to tell me that people are going wild over my book. Also, a new girl told me, when asked what my royalties for the fourth quarter, she said, "Well, you sold 19 books in October, (2009)" Then I heard some whispering, and she said, "You did not sell any books in the 4th Quarter." I estimate they sold 2-million books in the six-year period, 2003-2009. When I found a new publisher, I demanded my 8 original copies be returned, they refused, and they continue selling my book, even though I made it clear that I did not want them to sell anymore books. I assured those thieves that I WILL get my money. Thank you.
Buch September 21, 2010
Royalty rip off
To my utter misfortune, I became acquainted and started to use the services offered by 1stBooks publishers now known as Authorhouse, and published my first two books in 2003. At the time, I detected no problem with their services and accepted that being my work was academic, would not sell many copies. I decided to publish my third book with them, a large 2 volume edition in 2008, and due to the reviews and publicity received, and the professors that contacted me personally, I became fully aware of the university libraries and public libraries who processed my work into their establishments, or were interested in my work.

However, I noticed the first major discrepancy in their promises was that if I turned my manuscript in within a certain time frame, I would receive fourteen free copies of my work when it was printed.

I e-mailed my text, and mailed my contract via snail-mail two weeks before the deadline, I know it arrived on time—I live in Europe, and mail does not take longer than 4 to 8 days to arrive in the US, however, they could not honour the free copy agreement as they hadn't received the contracts on time. They never mentioned the agreement included receiving the contracts, just the manuscript. I received just my usual free review copy of each volume. I decided to let the matter go.

Then, they have a very careless attitude with other aspects of their services. For example, their Press Wire program that sends your Press Release electronically to 14, 000 media outlets. Where did I find my academic books being promoted? In the financial sections of these media outlets, and not to my target audience found in the academic, history, biography, or even literature, areas.

(I also discovered my university level academic book on classical music categorised as a “children's book”.)

However, the major problems developed with royalty accounting. I began keeping a record of the copies available of my new two-volume work at Amazon US, UK, Canada, and their Marketplace vendors. (This is practically the only way you can discern how many books may be selling in the public domain.) Considering this is Print On Demand, when a number of available copies drops, you can expect it to be a sale since stores have no reason to keep raising and dropping the numbers unless they make a sale and then re-list the book. (For the record, I withdrew all my publications from Authorhouse June 14th 2010.)

Authorhouse's numbers were way below the daily tallies I kept from the Amazon numbers, they only reported between 10% and maybe up to 20% of the sales on any given quarter. Today for example, I received the worst report yet: they reported only 1 copy of Volume One sold in the second quarter (April 1 to June 14th, the time I withdrew mypublications from them), and only 3 copies for Volume 2. According to my numbers from the Amazon rankings and marketplace sellers in the US, Canada and UK: 28 copies of Volume 1 sold, and 27 of Volume 2. Therefore they have reported only 4% of the sales, and they obviously are pocketing the rest. And this does not include other sales that may have been made through other sellers like Barnes and Noble, etc.

However, there is no way to be compensated for these discrepancies, Authorhouse demands you provide receipts of all sales as proof of your claim—how on earth do you track such receipts? Authorhouse knows it's an impossibility. Of course, Nielsen Book Scan offers sales report services, but you cannot use them to reclaim royalties, or display or disclose your sales report to any third party as Nielsen deems such action a breach of trademark confidentiality and would possible incur a lawsuit.

The simplest answer would be to cancel all contracts with Authourhouse, but this is not as easy as they make it out to be. To date, they continue to reassure me my books are no longer in print, but as I have discovered today (September 7), they are still listed with UK wholesale distributors as available within 5 days asPrint on Demand, so they are technically still available by Authorhouse illegally.

1st Books / Authorhouse in my estimation is the most disreputable company allowed to carry on a business offering a sham service to the public, robbing authors of the fruits of their labours. Surely they are required to have a business license to operate as all other businesses? How can any state issue a license and continue to allow such a rogue business like this to continue? They are operating on such a large scale, and if they are doing this to every author, then one must consider the possibility they are committing grand larceny on a massive scale. They claim to have thousands of authors with their company.

Authors Beware: if you are considering publishing your book using Print On Demand, stay well away from this company. Even if they paid all the royalties, they do little or nothing to help promote your work, but expect you to pay additional hundreds and even thousands for various promotion packages that provide little if no results. For those of you poor authors who now hold a contract with Authorhouse publishing your work, my sympathies go out to all of you.
E.A. Bucchianeri September 7, 2010
Authors Beware: Royalty Ripoff
To my utter misfortune, I became acquainted and started to use the services offered by 1stBooks publishers now known as Authorhouse, and published my first two books in 2003. At the time, I detected no problem with their services and accepted that being my work was academic, would not sell many copies. I decided to publish my third book with them, a large 2 volume edition in 2008, and due to the reviews and publicity received, and the professors that contacted me personally, I became fully aware of the university libraries and public libraries who processed my work into their establishments, or were interested in my work.

However, I noticed the first major discrepancy in their promises was that if I turned my manuscript in within a certain time frame, I would receive fourteen free copies of my work when it was printed.
I e-mailed my text, and mailed my contract via snail-mail two weeks before the deadline, I know it arrived on time—I live in Europe, and mail does not take longer than 4 to 8 days to arrive in the US, however, they could not honour the free copy agreement as they hadn't received the contracts on time. They never mentioned the agreement included receiving the contracts, just the manuscript. I received just my usual free review copy of each volume. I decided to let the matter go.

Then, they have a very careless attitude with other aspects of their services. For example, their Press Wire program that sends your Press Release electronically to 14, 000 media outlets. Where did I find my academic books being promoted? In the financial sections of these media outlets, and not to my target audience found in the academic, history, biography, or even literature, areas.
(I also discovered my university level academic book on classical music categorised as a “children's book”.)

However, the major problems developed with royalty accounting. I began keeping a record of the copies available of my new two-volume work at Amazon US, UK, Canada, and their Marketplace vendors. (This is practically the only way you can discern how many books may be selling in the public domain.) Considering this is Print On Demand, when a number of available copies drops, you can expect it to be a sale since stores have no reason to keep raising and dropping the numbers unless they make a sale and then re-list the book. (For the record, I withdrew all my publications from Authorhouse June 14th 2010.)

Authorhouse's numbers were way below the daily tallies I kept from the Amazon numbers, they only reported between 10% and maybe up to 20% of the sales on any given quarter. Today for example, I received the worst report yet: they reported only 1 copy of Volume One sold in the second quarter (April 1 to June 14th, the time I withdrew my publications from them), and only 3 copies for Volume 2. According to my numbers from the Amazon rankings and marketplace sellers in the US, Canada and UK: 28 copies of Volume 1 sold, and 27 of Volume 2. Therefore they have reported only 4% of the sales, and they obviously are pocketing the rest. And this does not include other sales that may have been made through other sellers like Barnes and Noble, etc.

However, there is no way to be compensated for these discrepancies, Authorhouse demands you provide receipts of all sales as proof of your claim—how on earth do you track such receipts? Authorhouse knows it's an impossibility. Of course, Nielsen Book Scan offers sales report services, but you cannot use them to reclaim royalties, or display or disclose your sales report to any third party as Nielsen deems such action a breach of trademark confidentiality and would possible incur a lawsuit.

The simplest answer would be to cancel all contracts with Authourhouse, but this is not as easy as they make it out to be. To date, they continue to reassure me my books are no longer in print, but as I have discovered today (September 7), they are still listed with UK wholesale distributors as available within 5 days as Print on Demand, so they are technically still available by Authorhouse illegally.

1st Books / Authorhouse in my estimation is the most disreputable company allowed to carry on a business offering a sham service to the public, robbing authors of the fruits of their labours. Surely they are required to have a business license to operate as all other businesses? How can any state issue a license and continue to allow such a rogue business like this to continue? They are operating on such a large scale, and if they are doing this to every author, then one must consider the possibility they are committing grand larceny on a massive scale. They claim to have thousands of authors with their company.

Authors Beware: if you are considering publishing your book using Print On Demand, stay well away from this company. Even if they paid all the royalties, they do little or nothing to help promote your work, but expect you to pay additional hundreds and even thousands for various promotion packages that provide little if no results. For those of you poor authors who now hold a contract with Authorhouse publishing your work, my sympathies go out to all of you. --- E.A. Bucchianeri
MissPissedOff August 31, 2010
FRAUD
I have spent well over $4, 000.00 with this company and for what!!!??? They get your hopes and dreams up and DOES NOT DELIVER. Not only do I feel as they have ripped me off for the over all price for the quality of work but also for the "one on one author support" but they are also ripping me off for my royalties. And Im suppose to OWN the rights to my work! YEA RITE!!! My attorney is looking in to that as we speak! PS The Rapid Release Program is a bunch of BS. Keep your $500 in your pocket.
Gayle Walker August 19, 2010
Childhood Revisited ID 64153
I am at the final stages of getting my book published and started June 09 and now it is 18th August 2010. I had to approve all the changes but there was little creativity and input of the layout of the book from the production team. No initate at all to take control and run with it.
I found the editing of the book tedious and time consuming and Authorhouse hadn't even done a basic spell check (no full stops) at ends of sentences! etc. basic spelling corrections were ignored.
My book should well and truely be finished and on book shelves now but due to being passed like a football from on person to another no one seems to really care about my frustrations.
It has been very disappointing and if i had the choice i would back out of it and go to another publisher.
Please be careful to consider Authorhouse as a publisher that's my advice.
Gayle Walker
eriksaltman August 17, 2010
Maybe going out of business
Has anyone received any information that Authorhouse is going to file for bankruptcy? They have stopped responding to any communications. I would like to know since I do have funds tied up with them.
summer22 August 3, 2010
book publisher
if you are reading the complaints board then you to have been a victim of authorhouse and their scam, you can contact the attorney general in illinois and file a complaint against authorhouse.at attorney general of illinois.com its time for all us author to take a stand against authorhouse and stop them from scaming all us authors.
Daniel Asamota May 29, 2010
Theft of royalties
Hey Wes or Dave, both of you go to hell! We all know you were sent here by AuthorHouse/Xlibris/iUniverse to cause division and derision. You already know that I'm fairly well known so your arguments are first class grade A b/s! AuthorHouse is a crooked company and now that the D.A. in Indiana is investigating them, all of us need to give them all the support he needs and prevent a behind the scenes under the table payoff if that' s possible (and I'm not saying the D.A. can be bought). But I have no doubt that if AuthorHouse can pay somebody off that they will do it. Instead of planting these people online to try an explain away the theft of our monies they would save themselves a lot of trouble if they would just pay us our money then they wouldn't have to explain crap! So save your lame and stupid explanations, save your frickin' breath and just pay us the money we are owed or surely as God lives and give us life and breath He will bring you down to your knees! Without us you wouldn't have a business! Even if you paid us our money, you would still collect substantial profits per the agreements! But if we have to go to every company you deal with and turn over records and books, this thing is set in motion and we won't stop until we either get our money or see all of you in jail where you belong! Now take that back to your bosses at AuthorHouse because they have surely committed a crime by stealing our royalties!
Launa Jean Ellison May 21, 2010
paid but no action
I paid authorhouse $1, 082.43 and they did nothing! I sure would like that money back.

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